Culture?


What does that mean? Recently a post made it’s way around cyber space that was written by an American lady living in South Africa. You can find it here and I strongly suggest that you read it alongside this post.  That post inspired this post.

You see I love my  culture and language. That doesn’t mean that I don’t like other cultures. It is just a fact I enjoy braaivleis and I enjoy melktert and most of all I enjoy speaking Afrikaans. Don’t even talk about a lekker kuier in Afrikaans. (a very nice visit-this term is untranslatable I’m afraid-come to South Africa and we’ll show you.) I am an Afrikaans teacher and I even have a blog dedicated to the teaching of Afrikaans. I love the diversity of South Africa and I even grew up in a homeland and can speak English, Afrikaans, Setswana and a bit of Xhosa and Zulu.

I believe that everyone is equal before God and He created everyone. This post is to thank Annie Erickson for her letter. I know of a lot of Afrikaans people that needed to read it.

Second New Year


All over Cape Town people are preparing to celebrate “tweede Nuwe Jaar” or second New Year. The practice and comes from practices associated with the slavery and its history is linked with the Coon Carnival. In the mid- nineteenth century, the Cape slaves were given a day off from their duties on 2 January every year. During this alternate New Year celebration, the slaves would dress up as minstrels and dance rhythmically to the sounds of banjos, guitars, ghoema drums, whistles, trombones and tubas.

It is a day of great celebration.  I wish to see all the minstrels (Kaapse Klopse) one day.

Happy 1st and 2nd New year 😉

Are your ready for a new (version of the) South African flag?


No we are noFlag_of_South_Africa.svgt changing our National Flag…we are building one and YOU can be a part of it.

A South African flag is being built (or planted) near Graaff Reinet. It will be so big that it can be seen from space. Awesome!

In the true spirit of Ubuntu the whole world is invites to join in. You can be a part of this by adopting a plant or solar panel. You can find more information here. There are some that sees it at negative with lot’s of reasons but I choose to focus on the benefits.

The benefits of this project is immense. Job creation is one of the biggest plus points for me personally. Add to that tourism and the great effect that the Spekboom will have on the environment just makes it WONDERFUL.

So please go to the Giant Flag website and be a part of it. You won’t be sorry.

Day 25: Reasons why I love South Africa: Rugby and Braaivleis


Day 25: Reasons why I love South Africa: Rugby and Braaivleis

Rugby and Braaivleis go together. Today it is the Currie Cup Final between the Western Province and the Lions.

We are also braaing today and supporting the Western Province. I hope they win. When you visit South Africa you must try to go to a rugby game.

31 days

For a full list of posts in this series please click here.

Please remember to visit  this website for more information. Please do join me on this adventure.

Click here for more blogs taking part in this challenge

Why I love South Africa: Heritage sites Day 6


According to the Colins English dictionary a heritage site is a:

noun. a historical site, a building, or an area of the unspoilt natural environment, considered to be important to a country or area’s heritage. a world heritage site a site of international importance.

South Africa has many heritage sites. If you Google “South African Heritage Sites” the list is almost endless.

I am going to list some that I am familiar with and that I consider a must see:

  1. Union Buildings
  2. Voortrekker Monument in Pretoria
  3. Melrose House, Pretoria
  4. Church square, Pretoria
  5. Kromdraai Fossil site (Krugersdorp)
  6. Robben Island
  7. Sterkfontein Caves
  8. Table Mountain
  9. National Botanical Gardens
  10. National Zoo
  11. The Castle in Cape Town

And so the list can go on an on.

If you’d like to view all the heritage sites that I’ve blogged about please click here.

 

 

31 days

For a full list of posts in this series please click here.

Day 1: Wedding

Day 2: Why I love South Africa Day 2: Growing up

Day 3: Why I love South Africa: Heritage Day 3

Day 4: Why I love South Africa: Diversity Day 4

Day 5: Why I love South Africa: The colors Day 5

Day 6: Why I love South Africa: Heritage sites Day 6

Day 7: Why I love South Africa: The open road Day 7

Day 8: Why I love South Africa: The food Day 8

Day 9: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Cape Town Day 9

Day 10: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Jozi Day 10

Day 11: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kruger National Park Day 11

Day 12: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kaapse Hoop Day 12

Day 13: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Pilanesberg Day 13

Day 14: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Eastern Cape Day 14

 

Please remember to visit  this website for more information. Please do join me on this adventure.

Click here for more blogs taking part in this challenge

If you would like to know more about me please click here.

 


Why I love South Africa: The colors Day 5


There are many different cultures in  South Africa and this provides a lot of color to our country. This colorfulness is reflected in our flag as well.

Flag_of_South_Africa.svg

Three of the colours – black, green and yellow – are found in the banner of the African National Congress. The other three – red, white and blue – are displayed on the old Transvaal vierkleur (which also includes green), the Dutch tricolour and the modern flag of the United Kingdom.

I wanted  to showcase the many colors of South Africa in a concise way but couldn’t. My best option for this is to invite you to South Africa to come and see for yourself! 🙂

Below are some elements that provide color to our country:

Our Heritage

Our food

Our Landscape from Cape Town to Johannesburg

31 days

For a full list of posts in this series please click here.

Day 1: Wedding

Day 2: Why I love South Africa Day 2: Growing up

Day 3: Why I love South Africa: Heritage Day 3

Day 4: Why I love South Africa: Diversity Day 4

Day 5: Why I love South Africa: The colors Day 5

Day 6: Why I love South Africa: Heritage sites Day 6

Day 7: Why I love South Africa: The open road Day 7

Day 8: Why I love South Africa: The food Day 8

Day 9: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Cape Town Day 9

Day 10: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Jozi Day 10

Day 11: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kruger National Park Day 11

Day 12: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kaapse Hoop Day 12

Day 13: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Pilanesberg Day 13

Day 14: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Eastern Cape Day 14

 

Please remember to visit  this website for more information. Please do join me on this adventure.

Click here for more blogs taking part in this challenge

If you would like to know more about me please click here.

 

Boerekos: Bread


boerbrood

The bread of today will never taste like the bread of way back. They had to grind the grain by hand and used a sweet potato yeast. That was a long procedure to make the yeast and the bread soon got a sour taste. But the families and the appetites were big. They usually baked at least half a dozen a day. The bread was baked in an outdoor oven. The girls in the house usually started early morning.

Bread and beskuit (rusks) recipes are more or less the same. Rusks have added sugar and aniseed.

But let us start with the bread with a modern recipe.

First a few tips.
1. The bread and the yeast must be fresh. Use all purpose flour or bread flour.
2. Mix the yeast with luke warm water and not hot water.
3. Let the bread rise in a lukewarm place out of a draft.
4. If you want to add raisins etc to the bead use more liquid.
5. Preheat you oven to 200 degrees Celsuis and turn down to 190. Heat are lost when you put bread in the oven.
6. Use a food processor or if you are going to bake often buy a small breadmaker. You don’t have to get your hands dirty. The bread tastes the same.

Ingredients.
1kg flour
2 packets instant yeast
10 ml salt
15ml sugar
625ml lukewarm water.
5ml vinegar
15ml sunflower oil

Method.

1. Put the flour in a mixing bowl and mix the sugar and yeast well together with a wooden spoon.
2. Mix the lukewarm water and vinegar and add to dry mixture.
3. Start kneading with hand or machine and work the sunflower oil in until the dough is elastic and does not stick to your hands.
4. Make a round ball and cover with cling wrap after you sprayed the top with cooking spray.
5. Cover with blanket and allow to double in size.
6. Knea down carefully and place in sprayed pan. Pan only be half filled. Cover again with cling wrap after cooking spray on top. Cover with blanket and allow to double again.
7. Preheat oven to 200 degrees Celsius. Place pan/s in middle of oven and turn oven down to 190 degrees.
8. Bake for 40 minutes. Turn bread out. It must sound hollow if you knock on it. If not return for another 10 to 15 minutes.
9. For soft crust cover with damp dishcloth while cooling.

For more about Boerekos please click here. 

Why I love South Africa: Diversity Day 4


I love South Africa because of it’s diversity. Both the landscape, the food  and the people. I’ve included some pictures to show you the diversity of this beautiful country! Because this is only a 5 min post for Nester’s 31 day blog challenge please click here for more that I’ve written about South Africa’s diversity.

DIGITAL CAMERA  PicMonkey Collage5 cropped-1900070_10152320850601882_1867302950_n.jpg cropped-dscf5216-2.jpg  1978604_10152315450611882_1034463332_n 1912322_10152315450296882_499914813_n
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31 days

For a full list of posts in this series please click here.

Day 1: Wedding

Day 2: Why I love South Africa Day 2: Growing up

Day 3: Why I love South Africa: Heritage Day 3

Day 4: Why I love South Africa: Diversity Day 4

Day 5: Why I love South Africa: The colors Day 5

Day 6: Why I love South Africa: Heritage sites Day 6

Day 7: Why I love South Africa: The open road Day 7

Day 8: Why I love South Africa: The food Day 8

Day 9: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Cape Town Day 9

Day 10: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Jozi Day 10

Day 11: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kruger National Park Day 11

Day 12: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kaapse Hoop Day 12

Day 13: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Pilanesberg Day 13

Day 14: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Eastern Cape Day 14

 

Please remember to visit  this website for more information. Please do join me on this adventure.

Click here for more blogs taking part in this challenge

If you would like to know more about me please click here.

Boerekos: Bean soup


With heritage day still fresh in mind we will continue to discuss South African food using the heritage of the different cultures.

Boerekos was the traditional food of the European farmers of way back. This means the food that they ate daily on the farm and was grown on the farm. Everybody worked hard and had a healthy appetite. They believed rather cook too much than too little so there were always food for unexpected guests.

We will start with soup. Not thin soup but a pot of thick healthy soup ate with home baked bread and thick butter. There were coal or wood stoves and the soup simmered slowly. Most likely the whole day.

Bean soup

The French Hugenotes brought Bean soup to the Cape. It had to be cooked with pork boontjiesopmeat preferably bacon. We still cook it the same way today but the modern sugar beans only soaked for an hour and the first cook only 20 min.

Way back the beans were soaked overnight and drained. It was then covered with fresh water, cooked and drained. This is important to prevent embarrassment due to gas forming.  Fresh water was added and the slowly cooked. The following is added for taste. Onions,  potatoes, carrots, pepper, pimento  and cloves.

Salt are always added last otherwise the beans does not cook soft if added earlier.  The beans must always cook slowly for the skins not to come off or the beans to burst.

For more information about SA food please click here

If you would like to read about Boerekos specifically click here.


Why I love South Africa: Heritage Day 3


 

 

The third reason why I love South Africa is the rich heritage that our country has. South Africa is a melting pot of different cultures and people. As this is a 5 minute post I cannot discuss it extensively here. I’ve written a few posts about South African heritage and you can find them here. For this post I’m going to list 5 of my favorite  aspects of South African heritage:

  1. The diversity. Every culture has a different viewpoint and ideas. This is stimulating for good conversations.
  2. The colors. To see everyone in their traditional clothes is a treat.
  3. Heritage sites. There are many heritage sites. (I’ve blogged about some of them.) There is so much to learn and see.
  4. The food. South African food has a rich heritage. With influences from all continents.
  5. Our heritage is growing.  The melting pot is still hot and new ideas and concepts are added every day. We have new visitors every day and each one adds his spice to the mix.

For the next few days I will focus on these points.

Enjoy!

31 days

For a full list of posts in this series please click here.

Day 1: Wedding

Day 2: Why I love South Africa Day 2: Growing up

Day 3: Why I love South Africa: Heritage Day 3

Day 4: Why I love South Africa: Diversity Day 4

Day 5: Why I love South Africa: The colors Day 5

Day 6: Why I love South Africa: Heritage sites Day 6

Day 7: Why I love South Africa: The open road Day 7

Day 8: Why I love South Africa: The food Day 8

Day 9: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Cape Town Day 9

Day 10: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Jozi Day 10

Day 11: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kruger National Park Day 11

Day 12: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Kaapse Hoop Day 12

Day 13: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Pilanesberg Day 13

Day 14: Why I love South Africa: So many places to visit: Eastern Cape Day 14

 

Please remember to visit  this website for more information. Please do join me on this adventure.

Click here for more blogs taking part in this challenge

If you would like to know more about me please click here.